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  Records relating to PNF



Records relating to PNF
MEDLINE 1993 till 6-1998

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No. Records Request The searches below are from: A:PNF.HIS. 1 793 PROPRIOCEPTION 2 612 PROPRIOCEPTIVE 3 7010 NEUROMUSCULAR 4 2646 FACILITATION 5 51713 PHYSICAL 6 353644 THERAPY * 7 138 (PROPRIOCEPTION or PROPRIOCEPTIVE or NEUROMUSCULAR or FACILITATION ) and PHYSICAL THERAPY The searches above are from: A:PNF.HIS.

SELECTION OF 50 RECORDS AND ABSTRACTS
WITH DIRECT RELATION TO PNF,

Done by Beckers, August 1998.

Record 2 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1/98-6/98
TI: [Stretching]
TO: Stretching.
AU: Spring-H; Schneider-W; Tritschler-T
AD: Rheuma- und Rehabilitations-Klinik Leukerbad, Kantonssp ital Schaffhausen.
SO: Orthopade. 1997 Nov; 26(11): 981-6
ISSN: 0085-4350
PY: 1997
LA: GERMAN; NON-ENGLISH
CP: GERMANY
AB: Static stretching exercises have become very popular over the past fifteen years both in professional and amateur sports. In the fields of physical therapy and in manual therapy, in particular, static stretching has become part of a standard and successful treatment modality. Together with an appropriate strengthening program, static stretching techniques have become the therapy of choice for treatment of muscle imbalances associated with functional disturbances of the musculoskeletal system. Specific muscle length testing procedures have been developed to determine muscle shortening in clinical practice. In this article, the fundamental principles of the different types of muscle stretching techniques are described, including the dynamic stretching and static stretching techniques. The exercises are organized along th e concepts of passive static or neuromuscular stretching principles. The pertaining neurophysiologic fundamentals are discussed, as are the benefits of the individual methods of a functional exercise program. Examples are provided for the most important muscle groups.
MESH: English-Abstract
MESH: *Exercise-; *Exertion-; *Muscle-Contraction-physiology; *Muscle-Spindles-physiology; *Sports-
TG: English-Abstract; Female; Human; Male
PT: JOURNAL-ARTICLE; REVIEW; REVIEW,-TUTORIAL
AN: 98096655
UD: 9805
Record 7 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1/98-6/98
TI: Rhythmic facilitation of gait training in hemiparetic stroke rehabilitation.
AU: Thaut-MH; McIntosh-GC; Rice-RR
AD: Center for Research in Neurorehabilitation, Department of Electrical Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins 80523, USA. mthaut@lamar.colostate.edu
SO: J-Neurol-Sci. 1997 Oct 22; 151(2): 207-12
ISSN: 0022-510X
PY: 1997
LA: ENGLISH
CP: NETHERLANDS
AB: Experimental and control groups of 10 hemiparetic stroke patients each underwent a 6 week, twice daily gait training program. The control group participated in a conventional physical therapy gait program. The experimental group trained in the same basic program with the addition of rhythmic auditory stimulation (RAS). Patients entered the study as soon as they could complete 5 strides with hand-held assistance. The training program had to be completed within 3 months of the patients' stroke. In the experimental group RAS was used as a timekeeper to synchronize step patterns and gradually entrain higher stride frequencies. Study groups were equated by gender, lesion site, and age. Motor function was assessed at pretest using Barthel, Fugl-Meyer, and Berg Scales. Walking patterns were assessed during pre- and post-test without RAS present. Pre- vs post-test measures revealed a statistically significant (P<0.05) increase in velocity (164% vs 107%), stride length (88% vs 34%), and reduction in EMG amplitude variability of the gastrocnemius muscle (69% vs 33%) for the RAS-training group compared to the control group. The difference in stride symmetry improvement (32% in the RAS-group vs 16% in the control group) was statistically not significant. The data offer evidence that RAS is an efficient tool to enhance efforts in gait rehabilitation with acute stroke patients.
MESH: Aged-; Cerebrovascular-Disorders-physiopathology; Electromyography-; Hemiplegia-physiopathology; Middle-Age; Muscle,-Skeletal-physiopathology
MESH: *Acoustic-Stimulation; *Cerebrovascular-Disorders-rehabilitation; *Gait-physiology; *Hemiplegia-rehabilitation
TG: Female; Human; Male; Support,-Non-U.S.-Gov't; Support,-U.S.-Gov't,-P.H.S.
PT: CLINICAL-TRIAL; JOURNAL-ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED-CONTROLLED-TRIAL
CN: RR0712720RRNCRR; RR0712723RRNCRR
AN: 98007833
UD: 9802
Record 8 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1997
TI: Rehabilitation of Guillain-Barre syndrome.
AU: Meythaler-JM
AD: Spain Rehabilitation Center, and Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Alabama School of Medicine, Birmingham 35233-7330, USA.
SO: Arch-Phys-Med-Rehabil. 1997 Aug; 78(8): 872-9
ISSN: 0003-9993
PY: 1997
LA: ENGLISH
CP: UNITED-STATES
AB: Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) is the most common cause of acute neuromuscular paralysis in developed countries. GBS is a significant cause of new long-term disability for at least 1,000 persons per year in the United States, and more elsewhere. Given the young age at which GBS sometimes occurs and the relatively long life expectancies following GBS, it is likely that at least 25,000 and perhaps 50,000 persons in the US are experiencing some residual effects of GBS. Approximately 40% of patients who are hospitalized with GBS will require admission to inpatient rehabilitation. For GBS persons necessitating admissio n to inpatient rehabilitation, the requirement of prior ventilator support most strongly predicts an extended length of stay on inpatient rehabilitation. Other issues that affect rehabilitation are dysautonomia, cranial nerve involvement, and various medical complications associated with GBS. Deafferent pain syndrome is common in the early stages of recovery. Multiple medical complications, including deep venous thrombosis, joint contractures, hypercalcemia of immobilization, and decubitii, may develop in the early stages of recovery and interfere with the rehabilitation program. Anemia is a frequent finding in the first few months of illness but does not appear to interfere with functional recovery. Therapy should not overfatigue the motor unit, which has been associated with paradoxical weakening. Little is known of the long-term implications of the disability caused by GBS. Work similar to that performed for postpolio syndrome and spinal cord injury should be started in t he rehabilitation setting.
MESH: Acute-Disease; Aftercare-; Diagnosis,-Differential; Electromyography-; Immobilization-adverse-effects; Polyradiculoneuritis-diagnosis; Polyradiculoneuritis-physiopathology; Risk-Factors
MESH: *Physical-Therapy-methods; *Polyradiculoneuritis-complications; *Polyradiculoneuritis-rehabilitation
TG: Human
PT: JOURNAL-ARTICLE; REVIEW; REVIEW,-TUTORIAL
AN: 98002994
UD: 9801
SB: AIM
Record 9 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1997
TI: Effect of manual therapy techniques on the stretch reflex in normal human quadriceps.
AU: Newham-DJ; Lederman-E
AD: Biomedical Sciences Division, King's College London, UK.
SO: Disabil-Rehabil. 1997 Aug; 19(8): 326-31
ISSN: 0963-8288
PY: 1997
LA: ENGLISH
CP: ENGLAND
AB: The effect of four manual therapy techniques on the quadriceps stretch reflex amplitude (elicited by mechanical vibration) was studied in a randomized, controlled tr ial in 120 (20 in each of six groups) healthy human subjects aged 18-64 years. Passive and active techniques were studied; each under static and dynamic conditions. The passive procedures were massage (static) and knee oscillation (dynamic) for 5 min. Active techniques involved eight repetitions of isometric quadriceps contractions (static) and leg extension (dynamic). The two static techniques had no effect on the stretch reflex amplitude. Both dynamic techniques caused a reduction (active by 25%, p < 0.00001 and passive 12%, p < 0.05). Only the active, dynamic technique caused a greater change than in the control group (p < 0.005). The effect lasted for less than 1 min. These data question the ability of such techniques to make clinically valid changes in motoneuron excitability. Further studies are required on those with neuromuscular pathology, who may respond differently to normal subjects.
MESH: Adult-; Electromyography-; Exercise-Therapy; Massage-; Midd le-Age
MESH: *Leg-; *Physical-Therapy-methods; *Reflex,-Stretch-physiology
TG: Female; Human; Male
PT: CLINICAL-TRIAL; JOURNAL-ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED-CONTROLLED-TRIAL
AN: 97425438
UD: 9712
Record 10 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1997
TI: [Modification of reactivity by rhythmic neuromuscular stimulation]
TO: Beeinflussung der Reaktivitat durch die rhythmische neuromuskulare Stimulation (RNS).
AU: Kunnemeyer-J; Schmidtbleicher-D
AD: Institut fur Sportwissenschaften, Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe-Universitat, Frankfurt.
SO: Sportverletz-Sportschaden. 1997 Jun; 11(2): 39-42
ISSN: 0932-0555
PY: 1997
LA: GERMAN; NON-ENGLISH
CP: GERMANY
AB: The rhythmical neuromuscular stimulation (RNS) by Nasarov is a new method for optimizing performance. By transferring mechanical vibration to the tendomuscular system better coordination of peripheral and central nervous system could be achieved. A study with twelve heal thy students of physical education dealt with the question of the effects of RNS on drop jumps. After 12 minutes application of RNS the performance drastically decreased. Jumping height lowered and ground contact time increased. Recordings of EMG revealed corresponding alterations in muscle activity, such occurring in overload situations. Plastic deformation of tendon collagen and neuromuscular adaptation as stiffness-reduction of gamma-modulation is discussed.
MESH: Adult-; English-Abstract; Isometric-Contraction-physiology; Motor-Neurons-physiology; Muscle,-Skeletal-innervation; Physical-Education-and-Training; Reflex,-Stretch-physiology; Vibration-
MESH: *Electromyography-; *Muscle-Spindles-physiology; *Neuromuscular-Junction-physiology; *Physical-Therapy-instrumentation
TG: English-Abstract; Female; Human; Male
PT: JOURNAL-ARTICLE
AN: 97411675
UD: 9712
Record 13 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1997
TI: Effects of intensity of rehabilit ation after stroke. A research synthesis.
AU: Kwakkel-G; Wagenaar-RC; Koelman-TW; Lankhorst-GJ; Koetsier-JC
AD: Department of Physical Therapy, University Hospital Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, Netherlands. Fysiother@AZVU.NL
SO: Stroke. 1997 Aug; 28(8): 1550-6
ISSN: 0039-2499
PY: 1997
LA: ENGLISH
CP: UNITED-STATES
AB: BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: A research synthesis was performed to (1) critically review controlled studies evaluating effects of different intensities of stroke rehabilitation in terms of disabilities and impairments and (2) quantify patterns by calculating summary effect sizes. The influences of organizational setting of rehabilitation management, blind recording, and amount of rehabilitation on the summary effect sizes were calculated. METHODS: A Medline literature search was performed for a critical review of the literature. The internal and external validity of the studies was evaluated. In addition, a meta-analy sis was performed by applying the fixed (Hedges's g) effects model. RESULTS: The effects of different intensities of rehabilitation were studied in nine controlled studies involving 1051 patients. Analysis of the methodological quality revealed scores varying from 14% to 47% of the maximum feasible score. Meta-analysis demonstrated a statistically significant summary effect size for activities of daily living (0.28 +/- 0.12). Lower summary effect sizes (0.19 +/- 0.17) were found for studies in which experimental and control groups were treated in the same setting compared with studies in which the two groups of patients were treated in different settings (0.40 +/- 0.19). Variables defined on a neuromuscular level (0.37 +/- 0.24) showed larger summary effect sizes than variables defined on a functional level (0.10 +/- 0.21). Weighting individual effect sizes for the difference in amount of rehabilitation between experimental and control groups resulted in larger summary effe ct sizes for activities of daily living and functional outcome parameters for studies that were not confounded by organizational setting. CONCLUSIONS: A small but statistically significant intensity-effect relationship in the rehabilitation of stroke patients was found. Insufficient contrast in the amount of rehabilitation between experimental and control conditions, organizational setting of rehabilitation management, lack of blinding procedures, and heterogeneity of patient characteristics were major confounding factors.
MESH: Activities-of-Daily-Living; Cerebrovascular-Disorders-physiopathology; Occupational-Therapy; Physical-Therapy; Rehabilitation-methods; Time-Factors
MESH: *Cerebrovascular-Disorders-rehabilitation
TG: Human; Support,-Non-U.S.-Gov't
PT: JOURNAL-ARTICLE; META-ANALYSIS
AN: 97406286
UD: 9711
Record 14 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1997
TI: Human stance stability improves with the repetition of the task: effect of foo t position and visual condition.
AU: Tarantola-J; Nardone-A; Tacchini-E; Schieppati-M
AD: Division of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Institute of Veruno, Fondazi one Salvatore Maugeri, IRCCS, Italy.
SO: Neurosci-Lett. 1997 Jun 6; 228(2): 75-8
ISSN: 0304-3940
PY: 1997
LA: ENGLISH
CP: IRELAND
AB: The effects of repetition of quiet stance trials on body sway, recorded through a stabilometric platform, were studied in 12 normal subjects. With feet together, both with eyes open (EO) and closed (EC), a progressive shift forward of the centre of foot pressure (CFP) occurred with repetition. In addition, with EC, but not with EO, a significant progressive reduction in sway area (SA) and sway path (SP) occurred. With feet 10 cm apart, initial SA and SP values were significantly smaller than with feet together, regardless of the visual condition, but repetition of trials induced no significant effects on either posit ion of CFP or body sway under either visual condition. Results indicate the occurrence of a learning phenomenon in this simple postural task, whereby the body shifts towards a 'safer' position with a minimum energy expenditure due to reduced corrections of sway. Forward leaning and decrease in sway are two independently-occurring processes, each possibly due to a better central integration of proprioceptive input with repetition of trials.
MESH: Adolescence-; Adult-; Conditioning-Psychology-physiology; Equilibrium-physiology; Foot-physiology; Middle-Age; Motor-Activity-physiology
MESH: *Posture-physiology; *Psychomotor-Performance-physiology
TG: Female; Human; Male; Support,-Non-U.S.-Gov't
PT: JOURNAL-ARTICLE
AN: 97352743
UD: 9710
Record 18 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1997
TI: [A new dimension--proprioceptive training of the upper extremities and trunk. Case report of a 13-year-old tennis player after shoulder dislocation]
TO: Eine neue Dimension--Propriozeptives Training der oberen Extremitaten und des Rumpfes. Fallbeispiel einer 13jahrigen Tennisspielerin bei Zustand nach Schulterluxation.
AU: Stommel-A
AD: Bonner Zentrum fur Ambulante Rehabilitation, Bonn.
SO: Sportverletz-Sportschaden. 1997 Mar; 11(1): XV-XVII
ISSN: 0932-0555
PY: 1997
LA: GERMAN; NON-ENGLISH
CP: GERMANY
MESH: Adolescence-; Athletic-Injuries-physiopathology; Joint-Instability-physiopathology; Muscle-Contraction-physiology; Range-of-Motion,-Articular-physiology; Shoulder-Dislocation-physiopathology
MESH: *Athletic-Injuries-rehabilitation; *Joint-Instability-rehabilitation; *Physical-Therapy-methods; *Proprioception-physiology; *Shoulder-Dislocation-rehabilitation; *Tennis-injuries
TG: Case-Report; Female; Human
PT: JOURNAL-ARTICLE
AN: 97285958
UD: 9709
Record 19 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1997
TI: Facial neuromuscular retraining for oral synkines is.
AU: Brach-JS; VanSwearingen-JM; Lenert-J; Johnson-PC
AD: Facial Nerve Center, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pa., USA.
SO: Plast-Reconstr-Surg. 1997 Jun; 99(7): 1922-31; discussion 1932-3
ISSN: 0032-1052
PY: 1997
LA: ENGLISH
CP: UNITED-STATES
AB: The purpose of this paper is to describe the outcome of facial neuromuscular retraining for brow to oral and ocular to oral synkinesis in individuals with facial nerve disorders. Fourteen patients with unilateral facial nerve disorders and oral synkinesis who were enrolled in physical therapy for retraining were studied. Synkinesis was measured with quantitative video facial position analysis prior to the initiation of physical therapy and at regular intervals during retraining. Retraining included surface electromyographic biofeedback-assisted specific strategies for facial muscle reeducation and a home exercise program of specific facial movements. Twelve of 13 patients with brow to oral synkinesis and 12 of 14 patients with ocular to oral synkinesis reduced their synkinesis with retraining. Patients with a 1-year on greater duration of a facial neuromuscular disorder (excluding patients with unusually marked changes) demonstrated a significant decrease in brow to oral synkinesis and in ocular to oral synkinesis; there was a mean percentage decline in abnormal movement of 60.5 percent (SD = 26.48) and 30.1 percent (SD = 62.57), respectively. We conclude that brow to oral and ocular to oral synkineses associated with partial recovery from facial paralysis were reduced with facial neuromuscular retraining for individuals with facial nerve disorders.
MESH: Adult-; Aged-; Biofeedback-Psychology; Electromyography-; Eyebrows-physiology; Eyelids-physiology; Facial-Nerve-Diseases-therapy; Follow-Up-Studies; Middle-Age; Mouth-physiology; Muscle-Contraction; Neuromuscular-Diseases-therapy; Oculomotor-Muscles-physiology; Treatment-Outcome; Vide o-Recording
MESH: *Facial-Muscles-physiopathology; *Facial-Paralysis-therapy; *Neuromuscular-Junction-physiology; *Physical-Therapy
TG: Female; Human; Male
PT: JOURNAL-ARTICLE
AN: 97324610
UD: 9709
SB: AIM
Record 20 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1997
TI: Ability to reproduce head position after whiplash injury.
AU: Loudon-JK; Ruhl-M; Field-E
AD: Department of Physical Therapy Education, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, USA.
SO: Spine. 1997 Apr 15; 22(8): 865-8
ISSN: 0362-2436
PY: 1997
LA: ENGLISH
CP: UNITED-STATES
AB: STUDY DESIGN: A two-group design with repeated measures. OBJECTIVES: To determine if there is loss of the ability to reproduce target position of the cervical spine individuals who have sustained a whiplash injury. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: The ability to sense position is a prerequisite for functional movement. Injury may have a deleterious effect on this a bility, resulting in inaccurate positioning of the head and neck with respect to the body coordinates and to the environment. METHODS: Eleven subjects with history of whiplash injury (age, 42 +/- 8.7 years) and 11 age-matched asymptomatic subjects (age, 43 +/- 3.1 years) participated in the study. Effects of whiplash injury on the ability to replicate a target position of the head were assessed. Maximum rotation of the neck and ability to reproduce the target angle were measured using a standard cervical range-of-motion device. Subjects' perception of "neutral" position was also assessed. RESULTS: Analysis of variance indicated the whiplash subjects were less accurate in reproducing the target angle than were control subjects. These whiplash subjects tended to overshoot the target. In addition, the subjects in the whiplash group were often inaccurate in their assessment of neutral position. CONCLUSIONS: Subjects who have experienced a whiplash injury demonstrate a deficit in their ability to reproduce a target position of the neck. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that these subjects possess an inaccurate perception of head position secondary to their injury. This study has implications for the rehabilitation of individuals with whiplash injury.
MESH: Adult-; Analysis-of-Variance; Case-Control-Studies; Cervical-Vertebrae-injuries; Physical-Therapy; Posture-physiology; Range-of-Motion,-Articular-physiology; Whiplash-Injuries-diagnosis; Whiplash-Injuries-rehabilitation
MESH: *Cervical-Vertebrae-physiopathology; *Head-; *Proprioception-physiology; *Whiplash-Injuries-physiopathology
TG: Female; Human; Male
PT: JOURNAL-ARTICLE
AN: 97273529
UD: 9709
Record 21 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1997
TI: Comparisons of weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing tests of knee proprioception performed by patients with patello-femoral pain syndrome and asymptomatic individuals.
AU: Kramer-J; Handfi eld-T; Kiefer-G; Forwell-L; Birmingham-T
AD: Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Applied Health Sciences, University of Western Ontario, Canada.
SO: Clin-J-Sport-Med. 1997 Apr; 7(2): 113-8
ISSN: 1050-642X
PY: 1997
LA: ENGLISH
CP: UNITED-STATES
AB: OBJECTIVE: To compare non-weight-bearing (sitting) and weight-bearing (standing, with approximately 95% of body weight on the test leg) tests of knee proprioception performed by patients with patello-femoral pain syndrome (PFPS) and asymptomatic individuals. DESIGN: A repeated measures design, repeated on two occasions. SETTING: Athletic injuries clinic. PARTICIPANTS: Seven men and 17 women with PFPS, and age- and sex-matched asymptomatic individuals. INTERVENTIONS: With their eyes closed, subjects extended their knee in sitting, or flexed their knees in standing, attempting to replicate target angles (15 degrees, 30 degrees, 45 degrees, and 60 degrees knee flexion) measured using an electrogoniometer. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Observed angle of knee flexion during joint angle replication tests. RESULTS: Test-retest reliability coefficients (0.17-0.79) and between-session measurement error (+/-2.0 degrees to +/-6.4 degrees) varied widely. There was a tendency for reliability coefficients to be greater and between-session measurement error to be lower, for PFPS subjects, and for sitting tests. No significant differences were observed between the scores of the PFPS and asymptomatic subjects, at any of the four target knee angles. CONCLUSIONS: Scores in sitting should not be compared with those in standing. Clinically, the low reliability coefficients, large between-session measurement error, and finding of no statistically significant difference between PFPS and asymptomatic subjects suggest that the diagnostic value of the proprioceptive tests used is questionable. Further research is required to develop more precise tests of knee proprioception and to deter mine if the present results are applicable to other pathologies.
MESH: Adult-; Biomechanics-; Evaluation-Studies; Femur-physiopathology; Joint-Diseases-physiopathology; Pain-etiology; Patella-physiopathology; Reproducibility-of-Results; Syndrome-; Weight-Bearing
MESH: *Femur-; *Knee-Joint-physiopathology; *Pain-physiopathology; *Patella-; *Proprioception-
TG: Female; Human; Male
PT: JOURNAL-ARTICLE
AN: 97268164
UD: 9708
Record 23 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1997
TI: Postural perturbations: new insights for treatment of balance disorders.
AU: Horak-FB; Henry-SM; Shumway-Cook-A
AD: RS Dow Neurological Sciences Institute, Portland, OR 97209-1595, USA. Fay@nsi.lhs.org
SO: Phys-Ther. 1997 May; 77(5): 517-33
ISSN: 0031-9023
PY: 1997
LA: ENGLISH
CP: UNITED-STATES
AB: This article reviews the neural control of posture as understood through studies of automatic responses to mechanical perturbation s. Recent studies of responses to postural perturbations have provided a new view of how postural stability is controlled, and this view has profound implications for physical therapy practice. We discuss the implications for rehabilitation of balance disorders and demonstrate how an understanding of the specific systems underlying postural control can help to focus and enrich our therapeutic approaches. By understanding the basic systems underlying control of balance, such as strategy selection, rapid latencies, coordinated temporal spatial patterns, force control, and context-specific adaptations, therapists can focus their treatment on each patient's specific impairments. Research on postural responses to surface translations has shown that balance is not based on a fixed set of equilibrium reflexes but on a flexible, functional motor skill that can adapt with training and experience. More research is needed to determine the extent to which quantification of automatic po stural responses has practical implications for predicting falls in patients with constraints in their postural control system.
MESH: Biomechanics-; Joints-physiopathology; Motor-Skills-physiology; Movement-physiology; Proprioception-physiology; Reaction-Time-physiology; Sensation-Disorders-rehabilitation
MESH: *Equilibrium-physiology; *Posture-physiology; *Sensation-Disorders-physiopathology
TG: Human
PT: JOURNAL-ARTICLE; REVIEW; REVIEW,-TUTORIAL
AN: 97293868
UD: 9708
SB: AIM
Record 25 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1997
TI: Sensory perception in Parkinson disease.
AU: Jobst-EE; Melnick-ME; Byl-NN; Dowling-GA; Aminoff-MJ
AD: Graduate Program in Physical Therapy, University of California, San Francisco, USA.
SO: Arch-Neurol. 1997 Apr; 54(4): 450-4
ISSN: 0003-9942
PY: 1997
LA: ENGLISH
CP: UNITED-STATES
AB: OBJECTIVE: To determine whether there is a complex sensory disturbance that may b e contributing to the motor deficit in patients with Parkinson disease. DESIGN: Comparison of performance by patients and healthy, age- and sex-matched subjects in tests of various sensory functions. SETTING: The Center for Human Performance and Testing at a university hospital and research center. PARTICIPANTS: Ten subjects with Parkinson disease and 10 control subjects matched for age and sex. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Performance on 4 subjects of the Sensory Integration and Praxis Test: finger identification, graphesthesia, localization of tactile stimuli, and kinesthesia. RESULTS: Data were analyzed using paired t tests for ratio data and the paired Wilcoxon test for ordinal data. Patients with Parkinson disease performed significantly worse (P = .001) than the control patients on the test of kinesthesia. There were no significant differences between the 2 groups on the other subtests. CONCLUSIONS: Without visual guidance, patients with Parkinson disease had more difficulty in perceiving the extent of a movement made to a target away from the body, a task requiring reliance on proprioceptive feedback. Parkinsonian patients had no more difficulty than controls in making movements to a target on the surface of the body when they could use tactile sensations. Movement difficulties in patients with Parkinson disease may relate in part to a decrease in proprioception. Activities that enhance kinesthetic awareness may be an important adjunct to the treatment of these patients.
MESH: Kinesthesis-; Motor-Activity; Motor-Skills; Touch-; Vision-
MESH: *Parkinson-Disease-physiopathology; *Sensation-Disorders-physiopathology
TG: Human
PT: JOURNAL-ARTICLE
AN: 97263875
UD: 9707
SB: AIM
Record 27 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1997
TI: The effects of neuromuscular stimulation-induced muscle contraction versus elevation on hand edema in CVA patients.
AU: Faghri-PD
AD: Department of Health Promotion and All ied Health Sciences, University of Connecticut, School of Allied Health Storrs 06269-2101, USA.
SO: J-Hand-Ther. 1997 Jan-Mar; 10(1): 29-34
ISSN: 0894-1130
PY: 1997
LA: ENGLISH
CP: UNITED-STATES
AB: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the use of neuromuscular stimulation (NMS)-induced contraction of the paralyzed muscles to produce an active muscle pump for removing excess fluid and compare its effect with elevation of the upper extremity. The effects of 30 minutes of NMS of the finger and wrist flexors and extensors were compared with the effects of 30 minutes of limb elevation alone. Each of eight cerebrovascular accident (CVA) patients with visible hand edema received both treatments, one on each of 2 consecutive days. Measures of hand and arm volume and upper and lower arm girth were taken before and after each treatment. Analyses comparing mean percentage change scores for both treatments showed large and signifi cant treatment effects for all dependent measures. The finding suggests that NMS was more effective for reduction of hand edema than limb elevation alone for this sample of eight CVA patients.
MESH: Aged-; Cerebrovascular-Disorders-complications; Edema-etiology; Edema-physiopathology; Electric-Stimulation-Therapy; Hemiplegia-etiology
MESH: *Cerebrovascular-Disorders-rehabilitation; *Edema-therapy; *Hand-; *Hemiplegia-rehabilitation; *Muscle-Contraction; *Physical-Therapy
TG: Human; Support,-Non-U.S.-Gov't
PT: CLINICAL-TRIAL; JOURNAL-ARTICLE
AN: 97225281
UD: 9706
Record 29 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1996
TI: [Proprioceptive reaction in the healthy and chronically unstable ankle joint]
TO: Die propriozeptive Reaktion beim gesunden und beim chronisch instabilen Sprunggelenk.
AU: Lofvenberg-R; Karrholm-J; Sundelin-G
AD: Department of Orthopaedics, Umea University Hospital.
SO: Sportverletz-Sportschaden. 1996 Dec; 10(4): 79-83
ISSN: 0932-0555
PY: 1996
LA: GERMAN; NON-ENGLISH
CP: GERMANY
AB: Chronic lateral instability of the ankle, a condition with frequent ankle sprain episodes, difficulties to walk and run on uneven ground and often pain, occurs in 20-30% after acute ankle sprains. The treatment of CLI as well as of acute ankle sprains have more and more in addition to operative reconstructions been focused on proprioceptive training which is in concordance with the results of recent research results. The present study shows that the reaction time after sudden angular displacement of the ankle on a trapdoor is increased by approximately 15 ms in patients with chronic lateral instability compared to control persons. We conclude that delayed proprioceptive response to sudden angular displacement of the ankle can be one of the causes to chronic lateral instability of the ankle and that proprioceptive training should be included in the treatment of acute an d chronic ankle disabilities.
MESH: Adult-; Ankle-Injuries-rehabilitation; Chronic-Disease; Combined-Modality-Therapy; Electromyography-instrumentation; English-Abstract; Joint-Instability-rehabilitation; Middle-Age; Physical-Therapy-instrumentation; Signal-Processing,-Computer-Assisted-instrumentation
MESH: *Ankle-Injuries-physiopathology; *Joint-Instability-physiopathology; *Proprioception-physiology
TG: English-Abstract; Female; Human; Male; Support,-Non-U.S.-Gov't
PT: JOURNAL-ARTICLE
AN: 97174026
UD: 9706
Record 30 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1996
TI: Effects of different treatments on postural performance in patients with cervical root compression. A randomized prospective study assessing the importance of the neck in postural control.
AU: Persson-L; Karlberg-M; Magnusson-M
AD: Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
SO: J-Vestib-Res. 1996 Nov-Dec; 6(6): 439-53
ISSN: 0957-4271
PY: 1996
LA: ENGLISH
CP: UNITED-STATES
AB: Patients with cervical root compression were used as a "model" to investigate the possible importance of neck disorders and cervical sensory information in postural control. We assessed postural performance with posturography before and after treatment in 71 consecutive patients with MRI-verified cervical root compression without medullary compression. The patients were randomized to surgery (n = 22), physiotherapy (n = 24) or treatment with cervical collars (n = 25). There were no differences in postural performance or pain intensity between the groups before treatment. After treatment, the surgery group manifested significant improved postural performance and reduced neck pain scores, as compared to the two conservative treatment groups, and their postural performance had improved to the same level manifested by healthy controls. The conservative treatment groups manifested no consistent significant cha nges in postural performance or pain scores. Decreased muscular tension due to reduction of cervical pain after surgery and normalization of cervical proprioception are suggested as possible explanations of the improved postural control.
MESH: Middle-Age; Neck-Pain-physiopathology; Orthopedic-Equipment; Physical-Therapy; Prospective-Studies; Splints-
MESH: *Neck-Muscles-physiopathology; *Nerve-Compression-Syndromes-physiopathology; *Nerve-Compression-Syndromes-therapy; *Posture-physiology; *Spinal-Nerve-Roots-physiopathology
TG: Comparative-Study; Female; Human; Male; Support,-Non-U.S.-Gov't
PT: CLINICAL-TRIAL; JOURNAL-ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED-CONTROLLED-TRIAL
AN: 97123724
UD: 9705
Record 31 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1996
TI: Cryotherapy in sports medicine.
AU: Swenson-C; Sward-L; Karlsson-J
AD: Department of Orthopaedics, Ostra University Hospital, Goteborg, Sweden.
SO: Scand-J-Med-Sci-Sports. 1996 Aug; 6(4): 193-200 < br />ISSN: 0905-7188
PY: 1996
LA: ENGLISH
CP: DENMARK
AB: The use of cryotherapy, i.e. the application of cold for the treatment of injury or disease, is widespread in sports medicine today. It is an established method when treating acute soft tissue injuries, but there is a discrepancy between the scientific basis for cryotherapy and clinical studies. Various methods such as ice packs, ice towels, ice massage, gel packs, refrigerant gases and inflatable splints can be used. Cold is also used to reduce the recovery time as part of the rehabilitation programme both after acute injuries and in the treatment of chronic injuries. Cryotherapy has also been shown to reduce pain effectively in the post-operative period after reconstructive surgery of the joints. Both superficial and deep temperature changes depend on the method of application, initial temperature and application time. The physiological and biological effects are due to the reduction in tempe rature in the various tissues, together with the neuromuscular action and relaxation of the muscles produced by the application of cold. Cold increases the pain threshold, the viscosity and the plastic deformation of the tissues but decreases the motor performance. The application of cold has also been found to decrease the inflammatory reaction in an experimental situation. Cold appears to be effective and harmless and few complications or side-effects after the use of cold therapy are reported. Prolonged application at very low temperatures should, however, be avoided as this may cause serious side-effects, such as frost-bite and nerve injuries. Practical applications, indications and contraindications are discussed.
MESH: Acute-Disease; Athletic-Injuries-rehabilitation; Body-Temperature; Chronic-Disease; Cryotherapy-adverse-effects; Cryotherapy-classification; Cryotherapy-contraindications; Cryotherapy-methods; Frostbite-etiology; Ice-; Motor-Skills; Muscle-Relaxati on; Muscle,-Skeletal-innervation; Muscle,-Skeletal-physiology; Neuromuscular-Junction-physiology; Pain-prevention-and-control; Pain-Threshold; Peripheral-Nerves-injuries; Physical-Therapy; Soft-Tissue-Injuries-therapy; Splints-; Sports-Medicine
MESH: *Athletic-Injuries-therapy; *Cryotherapy-
TG: Human
PT: JOURNAL-ARTICLE; REVIEW; REVIEW,-TUTORIAL
AN: 97051352
UD: 9704
Record 35 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1996
TI: The Facial Disability Index: reliability and validity of a disability assessment instrument for disorders of the facial neuromuscular system.
AU: VanSwearingen-JM; Brach-JS
AD: Department of Physical Therapy, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA.
SO: Phys-Ther. 1996 Dec; 76(12): 1288-98; discussion 1298-300
ISSN: 0031-9023
PY: 1996
LA: ENGLISH
CP: UNITED-STATES
AB: BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Disorders of the facial neuromuscular system can result in marked disfigurement of the face and difficulties in activities of daily living such as eating, drinking, and communicating. No systematic means of measuring the disability associated with facial nerve disorders exists. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the reliability and construct validity of the Facial Disability Index (FDI), a disease-specific, self-report instrument for the assessment of disabilities of patients with facial nerve disorders. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: The FDI was administered to 46 ambulatory patients of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center's Facial Nerve Center. The relationship of the FDI subscale and total scores with clinical impairment measures was determined, and a comparison of the use of the FDI and subscales of the more general SF-36 was made. RESULTS: The FDI subscales produced reliable scores (theta reliability: physical function = .88; social/well-being function = .83). Construct validity of the FDI physical funct ion subscale was demonstrated by a correlation with the clinician's physical examination of facial movement. The FDI social/well-being subscale was associated with the FDI physical function subscale and with a clinical assessment of psychosocial status within a subset of the sample (n = 14). The FDI represented the relationship between impairments, disability, and psychosocial status better than the generic SF-36 did. CONCLUSION AND DISCUSSION: The FDI subscales produce reliable measurements, with construct validity for measuring patient-focused focused disability of individuals with disorders of the facial motor system.
MESH: Activities-of-Daily-Living; Adult-; Aged-; Aged,-80-and-over; Middle-Age; Questionnaires-; Reproducibility-of-Results
MESH: *Disability-Evaluation; *Facial-Nerve-physiopathology; *Neuromuscular-Diseases-classification; *Psychosocial-Deprivation
TG: Female; Human; Male
PT: JOURNAL-ARTICLE
AN: 97119175
UD: 9703
SB: AIM
Record 36 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1996
TI: [PNF (proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation): gait training]
TO: PNF: Gangschulung.
AU: Reichel-HS
SO: Sportverletz-Sportschaden. 1996 Jun; 10(2): A11-20
ISSN: 0932-0555
PY: 1996
LA: GERMAN; NON-ENGLISH
CP: GERMANY
MESH: Gait-physiology; Muscle-Contraction-physiology; Neuromuscular-Junction-physiology; Posture-physiology; Proprioception-physiology
MESH: *Gait-; *Physical-Therapy-methods; *Posture-; *Proprioception-
TG: Human
PT: JOURNAL-ARTICLE
AN: 96387660
UD: 9702
Record 37 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1996
TI: Catchlike property of human muscle during isovelocity movements.
AU: Binder-Macleod-SA; Lee-SC
AD: Department of Physical Therapy, University of Delaware, Newark 19716, USA.
SO: J-Appl-Physiol. 1996 Jun; 80(6): 2051-9
ISSN: 8750-7587
PY: 1996
LA: ENGLISH
CP: UNITED-STATES
AB: T his study examined the catchlike property of skeletal muscle during eccentric and concentric isovelocity contractions of fresh and fatigued quadriceps femoris muscles of 10 healthy subjects. During concentric contractions of fresh muscles, stimulation trains that elicited a catchlike response (CITs) produced greater force outputs and rates of rise force than comparable constant-frequency trains. These enhancements became more pronounced during fatigue. CITs were less effective in enhancing forces during eccentric contractions but did improve the rates of rise of force. Overall, the CIT that produced the greatest augmentation had a 5-ms initial interpulse interval. Proposed mechanisms for the catchlike property involve enhanced muscle stiffness for more efficient transmission of tension and increased calcium release. These results suggest that stimulation trains that take advantage of the catchlike property of skeletal muscle may be helpful during clinical applications where neuromuscular electrical stimulation is used to restore function in patients with damaged central nervous systems.
MESH: Adult-; Electric-Stimulation
MESH: *Isometric-Contraction-physiology; *Knee-physiology; *Muscle-Contraction-physiology; *Muscle,-Skeletal-physiology
TG: Female; Human; Male; Support,-Non-U.S.-Gov't; Support,-U.S.-Gov't,-P.H.S.
PT: JOURNAL-ARTICLE
CN: R29AR441264ARNIAMS
AN: 96400537
UD: 9702
Record 38 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1996
TI: Evaluation of kinesthetic deficits indicative of balance control in gymnasts with unilateral chronic ankle sprains.
AU: Forkin-DM; Koczur-C; Battle-R; Newton-RA
AD: Frankford Hospital, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
SO: J-Orthop-Sports-Phys-Ther. 1996 Apr; 23(4): 245-50
ISSN: 0190-6011
PY: 1996
LA: ENGLISH
CP: UNITED-STATES
AB: If ankle proprioception can be determined to be impaired, then treatment can be more specifically directed towa rd correcting the proprioceptive deficit, thereby improving functional ability. The purpose of this study was to determine if collegiate level gymnasts with unilateral, multiple ankle sprains (ie., chronic ankle sprains) had decreased ability to detect passive plantar flexion of the ankle (ie., decreased ankle proprioception) and to determine if balance deficits existed during one-legged stance. Eleven gymnasts participated in 30 passive movement trials (15 movement and 15 nonmovement) presented randomly on both the injured and noninjured sides. The nonmovement trials consisted of either no movement of the ankle or passive movement of the ankle into 5 degrees of plantar flexion. Luce's choice theory determined that subjects were not biased in responding to a "yes" in perceiving movement or no movement during the movement/nonmovement trials of passive plantar flexion. Subjects were better able to detect movement during movement trials with their uninjured ankles th an their injured ankles. Subjects also performed single 30-second trials of one-legged standing on each leg, with eyes open and with eyes closed. Subjects reported better balance when standing on the uninjured ankle during the one-legged stance conditions. Although our results cannot be extrapolated to balance abilities during complex gymnastic routines, they do suggest that physical therapy assessment includes passive detection of joint position as well as single-legged stance tests, and that perhaps rehabilitation programs incorporate sports-specific balance activities for such injuries.
MESH: Adolescence-; Adult-; Chronic-Disease; Gymnastics-physiology
MESH: *Ankle-Injuries-physiopathology; *Ankle-Joint-physiopathology; *Equilibrium-; *Gymnastics-injuries; *Kinesthesis-; *Sprains-and-Strains-physiopathology
TG: Female; Human; Male
PT: JOURNAL-ARTICLE
AN: 96371536
UD: 9702
Record 41 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1996
TI: The effects of muscle fatigue on and the relationship of arm dominance to shoulder proprioception.
AU: Voight-ML; Hardin-JA; Blackburn-TA; Tippett-S; Canner-GC
AD: Berkshire Institute of Orthopedic and Sports Physical Therapy, Wyomissing, PA 19610, USA.
SO: J-Orthop-Sports-Phys-Ther. 1996 Jun; 23(6): 348-52
ISSN: 0190-6011
PY: 1996
LA: ENGLISH
CP: UNITED-STATES
AB: It is hypothesized that proprioceptive information plays an important role in joint stabilization and that muscle fatigue may alter proprioceptive ability. The purpose of this study was to determine what effect shoulder muscle fatigue has on glenohumeral proprioception and to examine the relationship between arm dominance and shoulder proprioception. Eighty subjects without a history of glenohumeral pathology participated. Each was seated on an isokinetic dynamometer with a randomly selected shoulder positioned in 90 degrees of abduction and elbow flexion. With vision blinded, the arm was passively positioned in 75 degrees of external rotation for 10 seconds, then passively returned to the neutral starting position. Three trials each of active and passive repositioning (2 degrees/sec) were recorded. Following a fatigue protocol, both active and passive repositioning were reassessed. Testing order was randomized. A significant difference was detected between pre- and post-fatigue scores. No significant difference was detected between dominant and nondominant extremities. No relationship between arm dominance and shoulder proprioception was established. It is concluded that shoulder proprioception is diminished in the presence of shoulder muscle fatigue, suggesting clinical rehabilitation protocols must emphasize increasing muscular endurance.
MESH: Adult-; Arm-physiology; Laterality-physiology
MESH: *Muscle-Fatigue-physiology; *Proprioception-physiology; *Shoulder-physiology
TG: Female; Human; Male
PT: CLINICAL-TRIAL; JOURNAL-A RTICLE; RANDOMIZED-CONTROLLED-TRIAL
AN: 96328832
UD: 9612
Record 45 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1996
TI: Effectiveness of an intensive outpatient rehabilitation program for postacute stroke patients.
AU: Werner-RA; Kessler-S
AD: Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Service, VA Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48105, USA.
SO: Am-J-Phys-Med-Rehabil. 1996 Mar-Apr; 75(2): 114-20
ISSN: 0894-9115
PY: 1996
LA: ENGLISH
CP: UNITED-STATES
AB: The effectiveness of ongoing rehabilitation services for postacute stroke survivors is poorly documented. We designed a randomized control, single-blinded study to demonstrate the effectiveness of intensive outpatient therapy. The treatment intervention consisted of 1 hr each of physical and occupational therapy, four times per week, for 12 wk; therapy focused on neuromuscular facilitation and functional tasks. All subjects were screened before the therapies and after 3 mo and 9 m o. Forty-nine stroke survivors, who were at least l yr (mean, 2.9 yr) poststroke, were randomized with two treated patients to each control (no treatment supplied). All patients had received inpatient rehabilitation at the time of their acute stroke, but no patient had any ongoing therapy within the last 6 mo. The outcome measures included the Functional Independence Measure (FIM), Brunnstrom stages of motor recovery, timed mobility tasks, and the Jebson hand evaluation. We also evaluated the level of depression, self-esteem, and socialization. The treated patients demonstrated an improvement of 6.6 points over the 3 mo of therapy compared with only 1.5 points in the control group in the FIM motor score transformed using Rasch analysis. The change from time 0 to 3 mo was significant in the treated group but not in the controls. Treated patients maintained their gains at the 9-mo follow-up, and controls lost ground. The treated group improved in terms of socialization and sel f-esteem as evidenced by a lower Sickness Impact Profile, whereas the controls tended to get worse. There was a trend toward less depression, but this did not reach a P = 0.05 level of significance. This study demonstrates that significant functional gains can still be attained in the postacute stroke survivor, despite prior inpatient rehabilitation services.
MESH: Acute-Disease; Aged-; Middle-Age; Single-Blind-Method; Treatment-Outcome
MESH: *Ambulatory-Care; *Cerebrovascular-Disorders-rehabilitation; *Occupational-Therapy; *Physical-Therapy
TG: Female; Human; Male; Support,-Non-U.S.-Gov't
PT: CLINICAL-TRIAL; JOURNAL-ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED-CONTROLLED-TRIAL
AN: 96198576
UD: 9609
SB: AIM
Record 47 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1996
TI: Complexity of age-related change in skeletal muscle.
AU: Brown-M; Hasser-EM
AD: Program in Physical Therapy, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63108, USA.
SO: J-G erontol-A-Biol-Sci-Med-Sci. 1996 Mar; 51(2): B117-23
ISSN: 1079-5006
PY: 1996
LA: ENGLISH
CP: UNITED-STATES
AB: Age-related changes in skeletal muscle mass, fiber area, and contractile function were examined in pathogen-free rats at 6, 12, 28 and 36 mos of age. The intent of this study was to clarify age-related decline, particularly in contractile force, and to determine if the decline in contractile tension with age is due to alterations at the neuromuscular junction. A variable amount of age-associated reduction in muscle mass was noted for the soleus (18%), extensor digitorum longus (EDL-16%), plantaris (37%), and gastrocnemius (38%) muscles. The decline in fiber area for these four muscles was between 5 and 16% greater than the loss in muscle wet weight. A variable amount of change in peak contractile force between 6 and 36 mos was observed for the soleus (62%), EDL (48%), and plantaris (34%). For soleus and EDL, the decline in peak tetanic tension exceeded the decline in muscle mass and fiber area. Most of the declines for the animals used in this study did not become significant until after the age of 28 mo. The marked reduction in peak tetanic tension, fiber area, and muscle mass between 28 and 36 mos indicates an accelerated age-related decline in this time period. The reduced peak twitch and peak tetanic tension in the oldest animals was not due to likely age-related changes at the neuromuscular junction. Peak values for tetanic tension were similar, whether tension was elicited via direct muscle stimulation or through stimulation of the nerve. Results underscore the complexity of age-related change and suggest that multiple mechanisms contribute to the decline of skeletal muscle.
MESH: Muscle-Contraction-physiology; Rats-; Rats,-Inbred-F344; Specific-Pathogen-Free-Organisms
MESH: *Aging-physiology; *Muscle,-Skeletal-cytology; *Muscle,-Skeletal-physiology
TG: Animal; Male; Support,-U.S.- Gov't,-P.H.S.
PT: JOURNAL-ARTICLE
CN: AG00585AGNIA; HL43700HLNHLBI
AN: 96202825
UD: 9608
SB: AIM
Record 49 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1995
TI: Measuring fatigue related to facial muscle function.
AU: Brach-JS; VanSwearingen-J
AD: Department of Physical Therapy, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, PA, USA.
SO: Arch-Phys-Med-Rehabil. 1995 Oct; 76(10): 905-8
ISSN: 0003-9993
PY: 1995
LA: ENGLISH
CP: UNITED-STATES
AB: OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to explore the expression of facial muscle fatigue in individuals without impaired muscle function using surface electromyography (EMG). DESIGN: Descriptive study of the expression of facial muscle fatigue in individuals without impaired muscle function. PARTICIPANTS: Convenience sample. Twenty individuals, 5 men and 15 women, between 20 and 50 years of age who volunteered to participate. OUTC OME MEASURES: Two tests of fatigue, a 10-second sustained contraction test, and a 25 repeated 3-second contractions test, were conducted on three facial expressions: brow raise, smile, and pucker. Surface EMG quantification of the muscle activity of the voluntary maximal facial muscle contractions was recorded during the fatigue tests. RESULTS: For the sustained fatigue test, all three expressions had a significant decline in activity (brow raise 34.51%, smile 22.96%, and pucker 29.05%); confirmed by a one-way ANOVA with repeated measures (brow raise df = 2, 38; f = 53.28; p = 0.00; smile df = 2, 38; f = 39.913; p = 0.00; pucker df = 2, 38; f = 76.002; p = 0.00). For the repeated fatigue test, percent fatigue was significant for smile (11.62%; df = 1, 19; f = 13.823; p = 0.001) but not for brow raise (7.27%; df = 1, 19; f = 1.945; p = 0.179) or pucker (4.22%; df = 1, 19; f = 2.508; p = 1.30). CONCLUSIONS: The muscle activity of sustained maximal voluntary muscle contractions of facial muscles fatigues significantly with time for brow raise, smile, and pucker expressions. The same facial muscles are more resistant to fatigue of muscle activity with repeated, brief contractions. Knowing the amount of facial muscle fatigue of individuals without impairment can be beneficial in developing outcome measures and goals for rehabilitation of individuals with facial neuromuscular dysfunction. Changes in fatigue tests of an individual with facial neuromuscular dysfunction with rehabilitation is reviewed for comparison.
MESH: Adult-; Electromyography-; Middle-Age; Recruitment-Neurology; Smiling-physiology
MESH: *Facial-Expression; *Facial-Muscles-physiology; *Muscle-Contraction-physiology; *Muscle-Fatigue-physiology
TG: Female; Human; Male
PT: JOURNAL-ARTICLE
AN: 96019858
UD: 9602
SB: AIM
Record 50 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1995
TI: Influence of physiotherapeutic facilitation techniques on motor evoked potent ials in centrally paretic hand extensor muscles.
AU: Hummelsheim-H; Hauptmann-B; Neumann-S
AD: Klinik Berlin, Department of Neurological Rehabilitation, Free University of Berlin, Germany.
SO: Electroencephalogr-Clin-Neurophysiol. 1995 Feb; 97(1): 18-28
ISSN: 0013-4694
PY: 1995
LA: ENGLISH
CP: IRELAND
AB: In the rehabilitation of stroke patients, various facilitation techniques are applied to reduce weakness in centrally paretic muscles and to improve functional motor capacity. The present investigation compared the facilitatory effect of 5 different physiotherapeutic approaches onto the centrally paretic extensor carpi radialis muscle in 30 stroke patients classified into 3 groups according to the individual degree of paresis. In order to quantify the influence of the respective facilitation manoeuvre, single transcranial magnetic stimuli were applied before and during the application of cutaneous/proprioceptive stimuli, a wei ght bearing task, contraction of the affected and the non-affected extensor carpi radialis muscle and during proximal preinnervation on the affected side. All procedures, indeed, enhanced the frequency of occurrence of muscular response potentials and their amplitudes while diminishing their response latencies. The most prominent effects were observed when the muscle itself was voluntarily activated. A similarly strong facilitation was obtained in the most severely affected patients with cutaneous and proprioceptive stimuli, but such stimuli had inhibitory effects in the healthy control group. The present study illustrates the interaction of cortically evoked motor potentials with peripherally or centrally generated inputs, contributes to the understanding of the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying physiotherapeutic facilitation techniques and helps in providing rational criteria to decide about the most appropriate facilitation method.
MESH: Adult-; Aged-; Aged,- 80-and-over; Cerebrovascular-Disorders-physiopathology; Cerebrovascular-Disorders-rehabilitation; Electromyography-; Magnetics-; Middle-Age; Reaction-Time-physiology
MESH: *Evoked-Potentials-physiology; *Hand-physiopathology; *Muscles-physiopathology; *Paresis-physiopathology; *Paresis-rehabilitation; *Physical-Therapy
TG: Female; Human; Male; Support,-Non-U.S.-Gov't
PT: JOURNAL-ARTICLE
AN: 95188781
UD: 9506
Record 56 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1995
TI: The contributions of proprioceptive deficits, muscle function, and anatomic laxity to functional instability of the ankle.
AU: Lentell-G; Baas-B; Lopez-D; McGuire-L; Sarrels-M; Snyder-P
AD: Physical Therapy Department, California State University, Fresno 93740-0029, USA.
SO: J-Orthop-Sports-Phys-Ther. 1995 Apr; 21(4): 206-15
ISSN: 0190-6011
PY: 1995
LA: ENGLISH
CP: UNITED-STATES
AB: Functional instability is a common complication following an acute ankle sprain. Three potential contributing factors underlying the ankle which chronically gives way are proprioceptive deficits, muscle weakness, and ligamentous laxity. This study's purpose was to document the presence or absence of these concerns in a sample of subjects with unilateral functional ankle instability. Both ankles of 42 subjects were randomly assessed for passive movement sense into inversion and generation of peak torque by the evertors isokinetically. Thirty-four subjects were available for documentation of talar tilt of both ankles through inversion stress radiographs. Analysis found significantly greater mean values for passive movement sense and talar tilt for the involved ankles compared with the uninvolved, while no significant strength differences in peak torque of the evertors were present. Fifty-eight percent of the sample demonstrated clinical impairments in at least one of these three categories. In conclusion, deficits in passive movement s ense and anatomic stability are greater concerns than strength deficits when managing the ankle with functional instability.
MESH: Adolescence-; Adult-; Chronic-Disease
MESH: *Ankle-Injuries-physiopathology; *Joint-Instability-physiopathology; *Muscle,-Skeletal-physiopathology; *Proprioception-
TG: Female; Human; Male; Support,-Non-U.S.-Gov't
PT: JOURNAL-ARTICLE
AN: 95291299
UD: 9509
Record 57 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1995
TI: Neuromuscular coordination of squat lifting, II: Individual differences.
AU: Scholz-JP; McMillan-AG
AD: Physical Therapy Department, University of Delaware, Newark 19716.
SO: Phys-Ther. 1995 Feb; 75(2): 133-44
ISSN: 0031-9023
PY: 1995
LA: ENGLISH
CP: UNITED-STATES
AB: BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE. This article reports individual differences in the coordination (ie, the relative timing of joint movements and muscle activity) of squat lifting identified by extended anal ysis of data reported in the authors' companion article in this issue. SUBJECTS. Two post hoc groups of 6 subjects each were identified from the original sample of 15 subjects based on qualitative differences in knee-lumbar spine relative motion plots during load acceleration. METHODS. Subjects lifted a crate containing 15% to 75% of their maximum lifting capacity using a symmetrical squat-lift technique. Movement kinematic data were obtained with videography, and the electromyographic (EMG) activity of the vastus lateralis and erector spinae muscles was recorded with surface EMG. Measurements of coordination derived both kinematically and via EMG and the kinematic data were examined for group differences. RESULTS. Subjects in group 2 limited lumbar spine motion during load acceleration for all loads lifted, whereas those in group 1 limited lumbar spine motion more when lifting the heaviest loads. These differences were obvious both qualitatively, via knee-lumbar spine rela tive motion plots, and quantitatively, via measures of the relative timing of joint motions early in the lift. The effect of load on the coordination of these joints was the same for both post hoc groups after initial load acceleration. Significant differences in other kinematic measurements were also found between these groups. CONCLUSION AND DISCUSSION. Despite specific instructions about how to lift the load, individual subjects coordinated their joints differently during the initial, accelerative phase of squat lifting. Individual differences in coordination in response to load increases could be categorized into two patterns, although the data of 2 subjects were difficult to categorize and thus not included in these analyses. Whether the two dominant patterns have consequences for stress to the joints during lifting remains to be determined.
MESH: Acceleration-; Adult-; Analysis-of-Variance; Biomechanics-; Electromyography-; Middle-Age; Reference-Values; Video-Rec ording; Weight-Bearing-physiology
MESH: *Lifting-; *Motor-Activity-physiology; *Muscle,-Skeletal-physiology
TG: Human; Male; Support,-Non-U.S.-Gov't
PT: JOURNAL-ARTICLE
AN: 95148708
UD: 9505
SB: AIM
Record 58 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1995
TI: Neuromuscular coordination of squat lifting, I: Effect of load magnitude.
AU: Scholz-JP; Millford-JP; McMillan-AG
AD: Physical Therapy Department, University of Delaware, Newark 19716.
SO: Phys-Ther. 1995 Feb; 75(2): 119-32
ISSN: 0031-9023
PY: 1995
LA: ENGLISH
CP: UNITED-STATES
AB: BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE. In this study, we examined changes in kinematic and electromyographic (EMG) measurements of the coordination (ie, the relative timing of joint movements and muscle activity) of a squat-lifting task in response to lifting increasing loads. SUBJECTS. Fifteen male industrial workers served as a sample of convenience. METHODS. Subjects lifted a weig hted crate containing 15% to 75% of their maximum lifting capacity using a symmetrical squat-lift technique. Movement kinematics were obtained with videography. The relative phase between joint motions was derived. The EMG activity of the vastus lateralis muscle (VL) and the erector spinae muscle (ES) was recorded, and the relative timing of their onsets and peaks was estimated. RESULTS. The relative phase of movement between joints such as the knee and lumbar spine changed in a quasi-linear fashion with increasing load during lifting but not during lowering. The relative time of onset of ES EMG activity and its peak activity changed in a manner consistent with the interjoint relative phase results. The timing of VL events were not affected by increasing the load. CONCLUSION AND DISCUSSION. Relatively continuous changes in interlimb coordination occur when increasing the load lifted from an initial squatting posture. Changes in EMG relative timing partially corroborate the k inematic evidence for changes in coordination with load scaling. The results indicate the need for further study to determine whether the observed changes in coordination are beneficial or detrimental to the musculoskeletal system. Clinicians should evaluate performance of this task under a range of task conditions.
MESH: Adult-; Analysis-of-Variance; Biomechanics-; Electromyography-; Middle-Age; Muscle,-Skeletal-innervation; Posture-; Reference-Values; Video-Recording; Weight-Bearing-physiology
MESH: *Joints-physiology; *Lifting-; *Motor-Activity-physiology; *Muscle,-Skeletal-physiology
TG: Human; Male; Support,-Non-U.S.-Gov't
PT: JOURNAL-ARTICLE
AN: 95148707
UD: 9505
SB: AIM
Record 59 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1994
TI: A clinical approach to temporomandibular disorders. 7. Treatment planning, general guidelines and case histories.
AU: Gray-RJ; Davies-SJ; Quayle-AA
AD: Department of Dental Medicine and Surgery, Un iversity Dental Hospital of Manchester.
SO: Br-Dent-J. 1994 Sep 10; 177(5): 171-8
ISSN: 0007-0610
PY: 1994
LA: ENGLISH
CP: ENGLAND
MESH: Anti-Inflammatory-Agents,-Non-Steroidal-therapeutic-use; Dislocations-therapy; Neuromuscular-Agents-therapeutic-use; Occlusal-Splints; Osteoarthritis-therapy; Physical-Therapy; Temporomandibular-Joint-Dysfunction-Syndrome-therapy
MESH: *Patient-Care-Planning; *Temporomandibular-Joint-Disorders-therapy
TG: Human
PT: JOURNAL-ARTICLE
RN: 0; 0
NM: Anti-Inflammatory-Agents,-Non-Steroidal; Neuromuscular-Agents
AN: 95001020
UD: 9501
SB: DENTAL
Record 60 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1994
TI: Neural modulation of muscle contractile properties during fatigue: afferent feedback dependence.
AU: Leonard-CT; Kane-J; Perdaems-J; Frank-C; Graetzer-DG; Moritani-T
AD: Physical Therapy Department, University of Montana, Missoula 59812.
SO: Electroencephalo gr-Clin-Neurophysiol. 1994 Jun; 93(3): 209-17
ISSN: 0013-4694
PY: 1994
LA: ENGLISH
CP: IRELAND
AB: H reflex amplitudes, an indirect measure of the excitability of the alpha motoneuron pool, were recorded from 10 males during fatigue induced by submaximal, isotonic, voluntary contractions of the soleus muscle. H reflex changes were correlated with electromyographic changes (mean power frequency (MPF); root mean square (rms EMG)), under ischemic and non-ischemic conditions. The purpose of the ischemia was to block transmission of Ia and possibly Ib afferents to assess whether changes in sensory feedback had any effect on alpha motoneuron and EMG activity during fatigue. Significant interactions were found between ischemic and non-ischemic conditions. After an initial decrease (1.21 +/- 0.56 mV to 0.54 +/- 0.39 mV), H reflex amplitudes increased during non-ischemic trials (0.54 +/- 0.39 mV to 1.13 +/- 0.84 mV). Under ischemic conditions H reflex am plitudes decreased (2.11 +/- 1.10 mV to 0.70 +/- 0.74 mV; P < 0.003). During non-ischemic conditions, MPF decreased across 5 consecutive trials (157.7 +/- 17.9 Hz to 124.7 +/- 17.2 Hz), as compared to an increase under ischemic conditions (132.8 +/- 21.2 Hz to 197.1 +/- 53.6 Hz; P < 0.001). Root mean square amplitude decreased during the non-ischemic trials (31.07 +/- 14.62 mV to 25.98 +/- 8.26 mV). A greater decrease was noted during the ischemic trials (34.00 +/- 23.61 mV to 4.95 +/- 3.77 mV; P < 0.001). Data suggest that the CNS modulates muscle contraction in order to preserve force output and neuromuscular transmission during fatigue. This modulation appears dependent on Ia and/or Ib afferent feedback.
MESH: Adult-; Analysis-of-Variance; Electromyography-; Feedback-physiology; H-Reflex-physiology; Muscles-innervation
MESH: *Afferent-Pathways-physiology; *Fatigue-physiopathology; *Muscle-Contraction-physiology
TG: Human; Male
PT: JOURNAL- ARTICLE
AN: 94265691
UD: 9409
Record 61 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1994
TI: [Could facial growth be influenced by neuromuscular therapy? Should one propose respiratory therapy or is it preferable to do nothing?]
TO: La croissance faciale peut-elle etre influencee par une therapie neuro-musculaire? Faut-il proposer une therapie respiratoire ou est-il preferable de ne rien faire?
AU: Tourne-L
SO: Rev-Belge-Med-Dent. 1994; 49(4): 9-17
ISSN: 0035-080X
PY: 1994
LA: FRENCH; NON-ENGLISH
CP: BELGIUM
AB: For at least a century, controversy has existed in the dental and medical fields regarding the level of significance to be ascribed to a predominantly oral breathing pattern on craniofacial growth and development. One school of thought holds that severely limited nasal breathing produces physiologic postural changes in the head and neck, which would have a direct effect on craniofacial growth, leading to the so-called L ong Face Syndrome or Adenoid Facies. This point of view implies that significant growth changes can be obtained by therapeutically altering the oro-facial neuro-muscular behaviour of the patient. The purpose of this paper is to critically analyze the clinical and experimental evidence regarding this controversy. Based on our present state of knowledge, one can't but conclude that neuro-muscular therapy or reeducation as a sole therapeutic measure is only of limited clinical importance.
MESH: Child-; English-Abstract; Facial-Bones-growth-and-development; Macaca-mulatta; Maxillofacial-Development-physiology; Physical-Therapy-methods; Respiratory-Therapy
MESH: *Maxillofacial-Development; *Respiration-physiology
TG: Animal; English-Abstract; Human
PT: JOURNAL-ARTICLE; REVIEW; REVIEW,-TUTORIAL
AN: 95207521
UD: 9506
SB: DENTAL
Record 62 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1994
TI: Vestibular rehabilitation.
AU: Foster-CA
AD: Unive rsity of California, Department of Neurology, Reed Neurological Research Center, Los Angeles 90024-1769.
SO: Baillieres-Clin-Neurol. 1994 Nov; 3(3): 577-92
ISSN: 0961-0421
PY: 1994
LA: ENGLISH
CP: ENGLAND
AB: Vestibular rehabilitation is a physical therapy programme for persons with symptomatic lesions of the vestibular system. When applied early in the course of recovery, it can hasten compensation. It can also reduce symptoms resulting from permanent deficits caused by vestibular injury. It has been shown to be effective when applied to patients with unilateral or bilateral losses, and reduces both dizziness and imbalance. Compensation occurs through tonic re-balancing at the level of the vestibular nuclei; by substitution of vision, proprioception and peripheral sensation for the missing vestibular input; and by the use of behavioural strategies to deal with residual deficits. The latter two mechanisms can be facilitated with rehabilita tion exercises. Treatment methods must be varied, based on the patient's underlying disorder. The best prognosis for full recovery is for individuals with acute, unilateral vestibular injury. Patients with bilateral lesions will show improvement, but will have permanent deficits. Persons with progressive vestibular disorders, those having central involvement and persons with visual or somatosensory impairments may require more prolonged courses of treatment or demonstrate incomplete recovery. Patients with a previous history of vestibular loss with recent decompensation require a thorough re-evaluation to rule out these more complex problems. Rehabilitation includes vestibular exercises, management of vestibular suppressant medications, general conditioning and patient instruction. Exercises should be directed at static and active posture and balance, eye-head co-ordination and symptomatic dizziness. Balance exercises include practice with standing, walking and turning. Eye -head co-ordination exercises require head movement during visual fixation or visual target changes. Treatment of symptomatic dizziness is based upon habituation to the provoking stimulus, usually head or eye movement. Home exercises are combined with formal physical therapy sessions and patient education to complete the process of rehabilitation.
MESH: Posture-; Vertigo-; Vestibular-Diseases-complications
MESH: *Vestibular-Diseases-rehabilitation
TG: Human; Support,-U.S.-Gov't,-P.H.S.
PT: JOURNAL-ARTICLE
CN: DC01404DCNIDCD
AN: 95179433
UD: 9506
Record 63 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1994
TI: [Combined compression and electric stimulation therapy]
TO: Die kombinierte Kompressions- und Reizstromtherapie (KKRT).
AU: Kopetzky-CD
SO: Wien-Med-Wochenschr. 1994; 144(10-11): 238-42
ISSN: 0043-5341
PY: 1994
LA: GERMAN; NON-ENGLISH
CP: AUSTRIA
AB: The use of compression- or Neuromuscular ele ctrostimulation therapy (NMES) for the treatment of venous and lymphatic disorders has been known for a long time. Furthermore, NMES is being used for the treatment of arterial circulatory disorders as well as for neuromuscular lesions. More and more often, external pneumatic intermittent compression therapy is being used for the prophylaxis of postoperative thromboembolic complications. If both methods are used simultaneously, a synergic effect is being obtained, where as the possible deficits of one technique are being counteracted by the advantage of the other. The KKRT is being described and the outcome of 2 trials performed in gynecological and dermatological field is being presented.
MESH: Aged-; English-Abstract; Follow-Up-Studies; Patient-Acceptance-of-Health-Care
MESH: *Bandages-; *Physical-Therapy-instrumentation; *Postphlebitic-Syndrome-rehabilitation; *Thrombophlebitis-rehabilitation; *Transcutaneous-Electric-Nerve-Stimulation-instrumentation
TG : English-Abstract; Human
PT: JOURNAL-ARTICLE
AN: 95159547
UD: 9505
Record 64 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1994
TI: Treatment approaches following foot and ankle injury.
AU: Seto-JL; Brewster-CE
AD: Department of Physical Therapy, Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic, Inglewood, California.
SO: Clin-Sports-Med. 1994 Oct; 13(4): 695-718
ISSN: 0278-5919
PY: 1994
LA: ENGLISH
CP: UNITED-STATES
AB: A complete and effective rehabilitation program begins with a thorough subjective and objective evaluation of the problem and injury presented. Biomechanical changes, whether they are anatomically induced or as a result of a form of compensation, must be identified and properly addressed. During the initial phase of rehabilitation, the issues of pain and swelling often must be resolved before full range of motion and return to normal strength can be achieved successfully during the more advanced stages. It is important to i ncorporate the entire lower quadrant in exercises that are designed to improve proprioception and function, using both in open and closed kinetic chain exercises. Finally, the demands to which the patient is returning to must be recognized to successfully complete the recovery phase.
MESH: Ankle-Injuries-therapy; Ankle-Joint-physiology; Athletic-Injuries-rehabilitation; Exercise-Therapy; Foot-physiology; Foot-Injuries-therapy; Gait-physiology; Muscle-Contraction-physiology; Muscle,-Skeletal-physiology
MESH: *Ankle-Injuries-rehabilitation; *Foot-Injuries-rehabilitation
TG: Human
PT: JOURNAL-ARTICLE; REVIEW; REVIEW,-TUTORIAL
AN: 95103598
UD: 9504
Record 65 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1994
TI: Effect of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation on the gait of patients with hemiplegia of long and short duration.
AU: Wang-RY
AD: Department of Physical Therapy, National Yang-Ming Medical College, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China .
SO: Phys-Ther. 1994 Dec; 74(12): 1108-15
ISSN: 0031-9023
PY: 1994
LA: ENGLISH
CP: UNITED-STATES
AB: BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE. The immediate and cumulative effects of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) applied to the pelvic region on the gait of patients with hemiplegia of short and long duration were studied. SUBJECTS. The subjects were 20 patients with hemiplegia of short duration (mean = 4.4 months, SD = 0.8, range = 2.8-5.6; n = 10) or long duration (mean = 15.4 months, SD = 1.7, range = 12.7-18.5; n = 10). METHODS. Each subject received a total of 12 sessions of PNF (three times per week), with each treatment lasting for 30 minutes. RESULTS. In subjects with hemiplegia of short duration, gait speed and cadence improved immediately after 1 session of PNF, and this improvement was further enhanced after 12 treatments. By contrast, subjects with hemiplegia of short duration. CONCLUSION AND DISCUSSION. These data suggest that (1) in both groups of patients with hemiplegia, the cumulative effects of PNF is more beneficial than the immediate effects, and (2) patients with hemiplegia of short duration respond to training sooner than do patients with hemiplegia of long duration, although the cumulative effects are similar for both groups.
MESH: Aged-; Kinesthesis-; Middle-Age; Movement-; Pelvis-physiopathology; Posture-; Time-Factors
MESH: *Gait-; *Hemiplegia-physiopathology; *Hemiplegia-rehabilitation; *Physical-Therapy-methods; *Proprioception-
TG: Female; Human; Male
PT: JOURNAL-ARTICLE
AN: 95083720
UD: 9503
SB: AIM
Record 66 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1994
TI: Efficacy of physical restoration in the elderly.
AU: Khalil-TM; Abdel-Moty-E; Diaz-EL; Steele-Rosomoff-R; Rosomoff-HL
AD: Department of Industrial Engineering, South Shore Hospital and Medical Center, Miami Beach, FL 33139.
SO: Exp-Aging-Res. 1994 Jul-Sep; 20(3): 189-99
ISSN: 0361-073X
PY: 1994
LA: ENGLISH
CP: UNITED-STATES
AB: Studies of the effects of physical exercise programs have shown that such programs can improve older persons' functional capacity. Research was conducted to determine the efficacy of two different types of physical restoration regimens--active and passive--in improving the performance of elderly persons with chronic pain conditions. Data from elderly persons admitted for back and pain rehabilitation to the Comprehensive Pain and Rehabilitation Center (CPRC) at the University of Miami are presented. The active approach consisted of the aggressive rehabilitation program at the CPRC, a 4-week program of daily physical therapy, occupational therapy, behavioral modification, and counseling. Treatment goals were improved strength, flexibility, posture, balance, gait, and overall well-being. The passive approach was based on the use of functional electric stimulation (FES) as an adjunct treatment to strengthen lower extremity muscles weakened by disuse. To evaluate the effectiveness of these approaches to physical restoration, we performed ergonomic assessment of subjects' functional abilities, including static strength and range of motion. Findings indicated that both methods were valuable in physical restoration in the elderly. Specifically FES proved effective in strengthening weak muscles in the lower extremities and shows great potential for neuromuscular conditioning in older cohorts.
MESH: Behavior-physiology; Electric-Stimulation; Gait-physiology; Incidence-; Movement-physiology; Muscles-physiology; Pain-epidemiology; Pain-physiopathology; Pain-rehabilitation; Physical-Therapy; Population-; Posture-physiology; Time-Factors
MESH: *Aged-; *Rehabilitation-standards
TG: Case-Report; Comparative-Study; Female; Human; Male
PT: CLINICAL-TRIAL; CONTROLLED-CLINICAL-TRIAL; JOURNAL-ARTICLE
AN: 95045829
UD: 9502
Record 67 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1994
TI: Effect of hamstring stretching on hamstring muscle performance.
AU: Worrell-TW; Smith-TL; Winegardner-J
AD: Krannert School of Physical Therapy, University of Indianapolis, IN 46227-3697.
SO: J-Orthop-Sports-Phys-Ther. 1994 Sep; 20(3): 154-9
ISSN: 0190-6011
PY: 1994
LA: ENGLISH
CP: UNITED-STATES
AB: The relationship between hamstring flexibility and hamstring muscle performance has not been reported. The purposes of this study were 1) to determine the most effective stretching method for increasing hamstring flexibility and 2) to determine the effects of increasing hamstring flexibility on isokinetic peak torque. Nineteen subjects participated in this study. A two-way analysis of variance was used to compare two stretching techniques: proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretch and static stretch. A one-way repeated measures analysis of variance was used to compare hamstring isokinetic values pr e- and poststretching. No significant increase occurred (p < .05) in hamstring flexibility even though increases occurred with each technique: static stretch (+21.3%) and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (+25.7%). Significant increases occurred in peak torque eccentrically at 60 degrees/sec (p < .05, +8.5%) and 120 degrees/sec (p < .05, +13.5%) and concentrically at 120 degrees/sec (p < .05, +11.2%). No significant increase occurred at 60 degrees/sec (p > .05, +2.5%). We concluded that increasing hamstring flexibility was an effective method for increasing hamstring muscle performance at selective isokinetic conditions. Further study is needed to determine if increasing hamstring flexibility will increase performance in closed kinetic chain activities.
MESH: Adult-; Analysis-of-Variance; Knee-Joint-physiology; Muscle,-Skeletal-innervation; Neuromuscular-Junction-physiology; Proprioception-physiology; Range-of-Motion,-Articular-physiology; Reprod ucibility-of-Results; Rotation-; Tendons-innervation; Thigh-
MESH: *Knee-Joint; *Muscle-Contraction-physiology; *Muscle,-Skeletal-physiology; *Tendons-physiology
TG: Comparative-Study; Female; Human; Male
PT: JOURNAL-ARTICLE
AN: 95038806
UD: 9502
Record 68 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1994
TI: Proprioception enhancement for anterior cruciate ligament deficiency. A prospective randomised trial of two physiotherapy regimes.
AU: Beard-DJ; Dodd-CA; Trundle-HR; Simpson-AH
AD: Nuffield Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Oxford, England.
SO: J-Bone-Joint-Surg-Br. 1994 Jul; 76(4): 654-9
ISSN: 0301-620X
PY: 1994
LA: ENGLISH
CP: ENGLAND
AB: We performed a prospective, double-blind, randomised, clinical trial to investigate the efficacy of two regimes of rehabilitation for knees with anterior cruciate ligament deficiency (ACLD). Fifty ACLD patients were randomly allocated to one of two treatm ent groups: a programme of muscle strengthening (T) or a programme designed to enhance proprioception and improve hamstring contraction reflexes (P). An indirect measure of proprioception, the reflex hamstring contraction latency (RHCL), and a functional scoring system were used to record the status of the knee before and after the 12-week course of physiotherapy. Sagittal knee laxity was also measured. There was improvement in mean RHCL and in the mean functional score in both groups after treatment. The improvement in group P was significantly greater than that in group T. There was no significant change in joint laxity after treatment in either group. In both groups there was a positive correlation between improvement in RHCL and functional gain.
MESH: Adolescence-; Adult-; Double-Blind-Method; Joint-Instability-therapy; Middle-Age; Prospective-Studies; Rupture-; Wounds-and-Injuries-therapy
MESH: *Anterior-Cruciate-Ligament-injuries; *Physical-Therapy-methods; *Proprioception-
TG: Female; Human; Male; Support,-Non-U.S.-Gov't
PT: CLINICAL-TRIAL; JOURNAL-ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED-CONTROLLED-TRIAL
AN: 94299619
UD: 9410
SB: AIM
Record 71 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1993
TI: Effect of fatiguing maximal isokinetic quadriceps contractions on ability to estimate knee-position.
AU: Marks-R; Quinney-HA
AD: Department of Physical Therapy, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
SO: Percept-Mot-Skills. 1993 Dec; 77(3 Pt 2): 1195-202
ISSN: 0031-5125
PY: 1993
LA: ENGLISH
CP: UNITED-STATES
AB: This randomized controlled study compared the accuracy of knee positioning by 8 women after fatiguing maximal isokinetic contractions of the quadriceps with those of 8 controls who performed no exercise. The mean algebraic error (AE) and variable error (VE) showed a significant posttest improvement for the control group after a 5-min, intertrial period. There was no change in ac curacy of knee positioning postexercise, however, for the experimental group. These findings suggest that, while a single bout of fatiguing knee exercises may not alter absolute accuracy of knee positioning, the movements may undermine the relative proficiency attainable by learning. They suggest a role for central as well as peripheral mechanisms in mediating this sensory modality.
MESH: Adolescence-; Adult-; Kinesthesis-physiology; Knee-Joint-innervation; Peripheral-Nerves-physiopathology; Range-of-Motion,-Articular-physiology
MESH: *Fatigue-physiopathology; *Isometric-Contraction-physiology; *Knee-Joint-physiology; *Proprioception-physiology
TG: Female; Human; Support,-Non-U.S.-Gov't
PT: CLINICAL-TRIAL; JOURNAL-ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED-CONTROLLED-TRIAL
AN: 94224566
UD: 9408
Record 72 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1993
TI: How do physiological components of balance affect mobility in elderly men?
AU: Duncan-PW; Chandler-J; Studenski- S; Hughes-M; Prescott-B
AD: Graduate Program in Physical Therapy, Duke University, Durham, NC.
SO: Arch-Phys-Med-Rehabil. 1993 Dec; 74(12): 1343-9
ISSN: 0003-9993
PY: 1993
LA: ENGLISH
CP: UNITED-STATES
AB: The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between physiological components of balance and mobility in elderly men without significant disease. Our a priori hypothesis was that physical function is influenced more by accumulated modest impairments than by a single deficit. We examined 39 ambulatory men (> 69 years). Subjects were classified functionally as high, intermediate, or low. Assessment included mobility functions (6-minute walk, mobility skills, reach, 10ft walk time) and physiological components of balance: sensory (vibration, proprioception, vision, vestibular), effector (ankle, knee, hip strength, range of motion), and central processing (response time to perturbations). All mobility functions were sign ificantly (p < .05) different between groups. Impairments in components of postural control were rarely different between groups: the major differences were in ankle strength and visual fields. The number of impaired domains differed across the three groups. Nineteen percent of the low group had at least three domains impaired; none of the intermediate or high groups were impaired in three domains. Fifty-six percent of the low, 20% of the intermediate, and 7% of the high were impaired in two or more domains. Variability in specific mobility measures was also predicted by the number of impaired domains. The decline in physical function may be better explained by the accumulation of deficits across multiple domains than by any single specific impairment.
MESH: Accidental-Falls-statistics-and-numerical-data; Aged-; Aged,-80-and-over; Analysis-of-Variance; Geriatric-Assessment; Logistic-Models; Proprioception-physiology; Psychomotor-Performance; Range-of-Motion,-Articul ar-physiology; Risk-Factors
MESH: *Aging-physiology; *Equilibrium-physiology; *Gait-physiology; *Posture-physiology; *Walking-physiology
TG: Human; Male; Support,-U.S.-Gov't,-Non-P.H.S.
PT: JOURNAL-ARTICLE
AN: 94082736
UD: 9403
SB: AIM
Record 74 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1993
TI: Compartmentalization of muscles and their motor nuclei: the partitioning hypothesis.
AU: English-AW; Wolf-SL; Segal-RL
AD: Neuroscience Program, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322.
SO: Phys-Ther. 1993 Dec; 73(12): 857-67
ISSN: 0031-9023
PY: 1993
LA: ENGLISH
CP: UNITED-STATES
AB: This review article is designed to expose physical therapists to an examination of muscle organization and the implications that this organization has for therapeutic applications. The partitioning hypothesis is based on the fact that an individual muscle is arranged in a more complex array than simply fibers attach ing at aponeuroses, tendons, or bones with a single muscle nerve innervation. Neuromuscular compartments, which are distinct subvolumes of a muscle, each innervated by an individual muscle nerve branch and each containing motor unit territories with a unique array of physiological attributes, are described. In addition, the organization of individual muscles into these subunits is paralleled by the organization of their parent motoneurons within the spinal cord. These notions are detailed in a review of data derived from studies performed primarily in cat and rat models. Recent data derived from morphological and anatomical study of human muscles support the existence of similar neuromuscular partitions. These data are complemented by physiological studies, the results from which suggest that partitions may have functional or task-oriented roles; that is, different portions of one muscle may be called into play depending on the task demands of the situation. The importance o f these observations for reconsidering how we provide clinical applications, such as neuromuscular stimulation or kinesiological monitoring, is discussed.
MESH: Cats-; Electromyography-; Exercise-Therapy; Monitoring,-Physiologic; Movement-; Muscles-anatomy-and-histology; Muscles-physiology; Physical-Stimulation; Physical-Therapy; Rats-
MESH: *Motor-Neurons-physiology; *Muscle-Contraction-physiology; *Muscles-innervation
TG: Animal; Human; Support,-U.S.-Gov't,-P.H.S.
PT: JOURNAL-ARTICLE; REVIEW; REVIEW,-TUTORIAL
CN: NS20545NSNINDS
AN: 94068648
UD: 9403
SB: AIM
Record 75 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1993
TI: Electromyographic activity of selected shoulder muscles in commonly used therapeutic exercises.
AU: Ballantyne-BT; O'Hare-SJ; Paschall-JL; Pavia-Smith-MM; Pitz-AM; Gillon-JF; Soderberg-GL
AD: Physical Therapy Graduate Program, University of Iowa, Iowa City 52242-1008.
SO: Phys-Ther. 1993 Oct; 73(10): 66 8-77; discussion 677-82
ISSN: 0031-9023
PY: 1993
LA: ENGLISH
CP: UNITED-STATES
AB: BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the muscle activity of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor, and lower trapezius muscles during commonly prescribed therapeutic exercises in subjects with and without shoulder pathology. SUBJECTS. Twenty healthy subjects (9 male, 11 female) and 20 subjects with recurrent unilateral shoulder pain and weakness (14 male, 6 female), aged 18 to 40 years (mean = 28, SD = 5.8), participated in this study. METHODS. Subjects performed each of the following exercises using a hand-held weight: prone lateral (external) rotation, sidelying lateral rotation, and arm elevation in the scapular plane. Indwelling fine-wire electrodes recorded electromyographic (EMG) activity during each exercise. The EMG activity in five phases of concentric contraction of each exercise was averaged and divided i nto three equal time intervals. Mean EMG values normalized to maximal activity for the entire phase of concentric contraction and for each of the three intervals were used in subsequent analyses. RESULTS. Two-way repeated-measures analyses of variance (ANOVAs) revealed between-group differences only in the prone lateral rotation exercise. Compared with subjects without shoulder pathology, subjects with shoulder pain showed significantly greater EMG activity in the infraspinatus muscle and less activity in the supraspinatus muscle during this exercise. CONCLUSION AND DISCUSSION. These results suggest that the pattern of muscle activation during specific shoulder movements in patients with shoulder pain may be related to pathology. Future studies are needed to determine whether an imbalance in neuromuscular control is a factor contributing directly to shoulder dysfunction or whether such an imbalance is secondary to some pathology.
MESH: Adolescence-; Adult-; Analysis-of -Variance; Case-Control-Studies; Muscles-physiopathology; Pain-physiopathology; Range-of-Motion,-Articular-physiology; Shoulder-physiopathology
MESH: *Electromyography-; *Exercise-Therapy; *Muscles-physiology; *Shoulder-physiology
TG: Female; Human; Male
PT: JOURNAL-ARTICLE
AN: 93391523
UD: 9312
SB: AIM
Record 76 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1993
TI: [Disorders of proprioception of the arthrotic knee joint]
TO: Propriozeptionsstorung am arthrotischen Kniegelenk.
AU: Sell-S; Zacher-J; Lack-S
AD: Orthopadische Universitatsklinik Tubingen.
SO: Z-Rheumatol. 1993 May-Jun; 52(3): 150-5
ISSN: 0340-1855
PY: 1993
LA: GERMAN; NON-ENGLISH
CP: GERMANY
AB: We measured proprioception of the knee joint by an active and a passive method in 40 subjects under 30 years of age and in 80 subjects older than 50 years with no evidence of knee joint disease. Joint position sense was also determined in an ad ditional 59 patients with osteoarthrosis of the knee. Proprioception was found to decline with increasing age. In the osteoarthritic knee the measured values were significantly higher than in both groups without knee-joint involvement. An elastic bandage had a positive effect. There was a positive correlation between proprioception and clinical parameters. Walking ability and range of motion did not significantly influence the proprioception. Patients receiving physical therapy showed an improved joint position sense.
MESH: Adult-; Age-Factors; Aged-; English-Abstract; Knee-Joint-radiography; Middle-Age; Osteoarthritis-radiography; Osteoarthritis-rehabilitation; Range-of-Motion,-Articular-physiology; Reference-Values
MESH: *Knee-Joint-physiopathology; *Osteoarthritis-physiopathology; *Proprioception-physiology
TG: English-Abstract; Female; Human; Male
PT: JOURNAL-ARTICLE
AN: 93377422
UD: 9312
Record 77 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1993
TI: Neuromuscular testing and rehabilitation of the shoulder complex.
AU: Davies-GJ; Dickoff-Hoffman-S
AD: University of Wisconsin-La Crosse 54601.
SO: J-Orthop-Sports-Phys-Ther. 1993 Aug; 18(2): 449-58
ISSN: 0190-6011
PY: 1993
LA: ENGLISH
CP: UNITED-STATES
AB: The shoulder complex plays an integral role in performing an athletic skill involving the upper extremity. The intricacy of the neuromotor components controlling shoulder motion and athletic skill is an issue that the sports physical therapist deals with on a daily basis when rehabilitating athletic patients. The purpose of this article is to review neuromotor control of the shoulder complex and describe an exercise routine developed to enhance proprioception, kinesthesia, and neuromuscular control. Clinical research studies examining the strength of the rotator cuff and scapular stabilizers, in addition to joint position sense, are reviewed. The results of these studies are discussed as they apply to the exercises described in the article designed to improve dynamic stability. The results of these studies and implementation of these exercises will help the sports physical therapy clinician assist the athletic patient and improve dynamic and neuromotor control of the shoulder.
MESH: Adolescence-; Adult-; Athletic-Injuries-diagnosis; Athletic-Injuries-physiopathology; Exercise-Therapy-methods; Kinesthesis-; Shoulder-Joint-physiopathology; Treatment-Outcome
MESH: *Athletic-Injuries-rehabilitation; *Exercise-Therapy; *Shoulder-Joint-injuries
TG: Female; Human; Male
PT: JOURNAL-ARTICLE
AN: 93372887
UD: 9312
Record 78 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1993
TI: Clinical use of neuromuscular electrical stimulation for children with cerebral palsy, Part 2: Upper extremity [published erratum appears in Phys Ther 1993 Nov;73(11):809]
AU: Carmick-J
SO: Phys-Ther. 1993 Aug; 73(8): 514-22; discussion 523-7 < br />ISSN: 0031-9023
PY: 1993
LA: ENGLISH
CP: UNITED-STATES
AB: This report, part 2 of a two-part case report on the clinical use of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) for children with cerebral palsy, documents the functional changes that occurred with the application of NMES to the upper extremity of two children, 1.6 and 6.7 years of age, with hemiplegia due to cerebral palsy. The NMES was used as an adjunct to a dynamic-systems, task-oriented physical therapy program. The youngest child showed immediate improvement in the ability to crawl and use both hands together. The older child demonstrated increased sensory awareness and use of the nonfunctional hand. Preliminary findings suggest that NMES may be a useful physical therapy tool for enhancing muscle strength increasing sensory awareness, and assisting motor learning and coordination.
MESH: Activities-of-Daily-Living; Cerebral-Palsy-complications; Cerebral-Palsy-physiopathology; Child-; Electric-Stimulation-Therapy-instrumentation; Electric-Stimulation-Therapy-methods; Hemiplegia-complications; Hemiplegia-physiopathology; Infant-; Motor-Activity; Physical-Therapy-methods; Psychomotor-Performance
MESH: *Arm-; *Cerebral-Palsy-therapy; *Electric-Stimulation-Therapy; *Hemiplegia-therapy
TG: Case-Report; Human; Male
PT: JOURNAL-ARTICLE
AN: 93330964
UD: 9310
SB: AIM
Record 79 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1993
TI: [The neurophysiological basis of exercise physical therapy in patients with central hemiparesis]
TO: Neurophysiologische Grundlagen krankengymnastischer Ubungsbehandlung bei Patienten mit zentralen Hemiparesen.
AU: Hummelsheim-H; Mauritz-KH
AD: Abteilung fur neurologische Rehabilitation, Freien Universitat Berlin.
SO: Fortschr-Neurol-Psychiatr. 1993 Jun; 61(6): 208-16
ISSN: 0720-4299
PY: 1993
LA: GERMAN; NON-ENGLISH
CP: GERMANY
AB: According to everyday e xperience in rehabilitation, stroke patients suffering from central hemiparesis physiotherapy is efficacious in reducing the degree of motor impairment. This paper describes the various therapeutic techniques used in the traditional physiotherapeutic concepts (Rood, Bobath, Brunnstrom, proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation, Vojta) and their basic neurophysiological mechanisms, as far as they are known today. Furthermore, the significant role of treating impaired sensation and perception for movement execution is discussed and various therapeutic concepts (traditional sensibility training, methods according to Affolter and Perfetti, forced use) are described.
MESH: Cerebrovascular-Disorders-complications; English-Abstract; Hemiplegia-etiology; Hemiplegia-physiopathology
MESH: *Hemiplegia-therapy; *Physical-Therapy
TG: English-Abstract; Human
PT: JOURNAL-ARTICLE; REVIEW; REVIEW,-TUTORIAL
AN: 93321972
UD: 9310
Record 80 of 83 - MEDL INE (R) 1993
TI: Effects of age and resistance training on skeletal muscle: a review.
AU: Hopp-JF
AD: Department of Physical Therapy, College of Associated Health Professions, University of Illinois, Chicago 60612.
SO: Phys-Ther. 1993 Jun; 73(6): 361-73
ISSN: 0031-9023
PY: 1993
LA: ENGLISH
CP: UNITED-STATES
AB: As humans age, there is a decrease in the ability of skeletal muscle to generate force. This review describes alterations in the neuromuscular systems of humans and animals that may be responsible for the diminished force-generating capacity of older muscles. The effects of resistance training on the force-generating capacity of older muscles in humans and on the neuromuscular systems of humans and animals are then examined. The age-related decline in force-generating capacity may be due, in part, to a loss of motor units and to a decline in muscle mass. Fiber atrophy and, possibly, loss of muscle fibers contribute to the decline in muscle mass in older persons. High-intensity resistance training appears to attenuate the age-related decline in force-generating capacity in humans and cause fiber hypertrophy of old muscle fibers. Investigations of the effects of age on the neuromuscular system and of the effects of resistance training on the neuromuscular system and the functional capacity of older persons are essential for the development of cost-effective interventions that will increase the physical capacity of older persons.
MESH: Rats-; Reference-Values
MESH: *Aging-physiology; *Muscles-physiology; *Physical-Education-and-Training
TG: Animal; Female; Human; Male
PT: JOURNAL-ARTICLE; REVIEW; REVIEW,-ACADEMIC
AN: 93268782
UD: 9308
SB: AIM
Record 82 of 83 - MEDLINE (R) 1993
TI: Complex balance reactions in different sensory conditions: adolescents with and without idiopathic scoliosis.
AU: Byl-NN; Gray-JM
AD: Graduate P rogram in Physical Therapy, University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine 94122.
SO: J-Orthop-Res. 1993 Mar; 11(2): 215-27
ISSN: 0736-0266 v PY: 1993
LA: ENGLISH
CP: UNITED-STATES
AB: We measured simple and complex balance responses with a force plate stabiliometer in 70 adolescents: 50 with idiopathic scoliosis (IS) and 20 controls. In stable static balance positions, the two groups performed similarly, but when the visual and somatosensory systems were challenged simultaneously, the IS group had a significantly higher mean body sway than the controls. Within the IS group, children with mild, nonprogressive curves that had not been operated on were significantly more likely to maintain their balance when the visual and somatosensory systems were challenged simultaneously than those with curves > or = 40 degrees, who had had surgery, and who had more rapid progression of the curve. These findings suggest that adolescents with IS have normal balance in static, stable positions but are not able to perform as well as normal adolescents in sensory-challenged positions, particularly if they have a severe, progressive curve. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine whether balance dysfunction can be used to predict progression of the curve.
MESH: Adolescence-; Child-; Pilot-Projects; Proprioception-; Vision-
MESH: *Equilibrium-physiology; *Scoliosis-physiopathology; *Sensation-Disorders-physiopathology
TG: Female; Human; Male
PT: JOURNAL-ARTICLE
AN: 93246885
UD: 9308